Landmark

A Vernacular Sculpted Installation / March, 2016

At Village Jaipura, Ludhiana, Punjab

Published: Emergent Art Space / Forum

Landmark 5

Landmarks are an integral part of our stories, imaginations and memories. They appear in our conversation and description of folklores.

In India, many families who live in cities have roots in villages where their ancestors lived, going back to village is special to all those who relish the fragrance of mud, starry nights, farms, fresh air and simple rustic lives. People delight in sharing anecdotes and stories of their villages, their memorable landmarks, shops, streets and roundabout where their forefathers use to meet, play or spend evenings.

Landmarks belong to all; they belong to the whole community that grows around.

Though I grew up in cities, I feel deep belonging to villages of Punjab. I love to go back to villages, spend time in farms, walk in gullies (village streets), watch activities and assimilate those experiences through my art.

LANDMARK: Design and Form Evolution

This project was an effort to revive the vernacular craft culture of Punjab where an age old technique ‘Wattle and daub’ has been re-explored and some antique craft objects were used as an integral part of installation.

The basic form of LANDMARK is inspired from a typical conical enclosures usually crafted by villagers in fields of Punjab called “Guhara” and “Kupp”. Guhara is basically used to store cow dung cake and Kupp is made up of dry wheat grass and is used to store the residues of crop.

Some old broken craft objects like “Charkha”(traditional spinning wheel), “Madhani” (traditional churn) & old earthen pots are used in the installation.

In villages the whole lifestyle is changing, due to the advancement in technology and adaptation of new machines, the handcrafted Charkha, Madhani and some other ethnic objects are no more in use, they are kept in stores. People do not use them, so to give them a new life, I used them as an integral part of installation. The purpose is to revive and conserve the value of traditional craft heritage. Rather putting them in dusty stores, its better to use them in some art form and create an exposure for new generations of village

I feel these kind of efforts in villages would help & inspire people (specially young kids) in future to connect with their tradition and explore many other aspects of their culture.

In a similar way, I aspire to work with various rural/urban communities to craft some spatial installations to create temporary or permanent ‘public activity spaces’.

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Size: Lower Dia: 7’ , Upper Dia 5’ / Height 9’

Materials & Medium: Bamboo, Wood, Jute Ropes and Bags, Mud, Husk, Cow dung, Peepal Leaves, Earthen Pots, Antique “Charkha”a traditional spinning wheel and “Madhani” a traditional churn.

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Work In Progress

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Concept, Craft Work and Photo Documentation: Darshan Singh Grewal

Assisting Artists: Arun Bawa and Jagmeet Singh Bhatti